Writers Unite! Tips on Writing: Grammar

Grammar Tips from Writers Unite! on the Web

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Adam J. Johnson: Benefits of Indie Publishing Part One – Tradition Publishing

A common question for a lot of writers is, do I traditionally publish or indie publish. Writers Unite! admin Adam Johnson, a proponent of Indie publishing, discussing the benefits of publishing the indie way in this new series on the “Benefits of Indie Publishing”. Check out Part One below!

Writers Unite!

Benefits of Indie Publishing

Part 1: Traditional Publishing

Many of us dream of getting that acceptance letter from one of the big publishing houses. We wait by the mailbox or constantly check our email in a child-like fervor, hoping to see “Congratulations” come through. We think that once we get that acceptance, life is set, we’ve made it, and we are now successful authors, right? Well, that couldn’t be further from the truth. There are so many hoops to jump through with traditional publishing, and for a brand-new author without an agent, you will almost certainly get the short end of a short stick. There are a few exceptions to the rules—those like J.K. Rowling, who found massive success with her first series, but that is a rare case. Yes, we all want to hit that goal, but we need to plan for reality and write like we’ve got that…

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Words Of Ernest Hemingway

Writers Unite! brings another great quote and advice from a popular author!

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Writing-Quotes-eh2-1024x499

Nobel Prize winner Ernest Hemingway is seen as one of the great American 20th century novelists, and is known for works like ‘A Farewell to Arms’ and ‘The Old Man and the Sea.’
Born on July 21, 1899, in Cicero (now in Oak Park), Illinois, Ernest Hemingway served in World War I and worked in journalism before publishing his story collection In Our Time. He was renowned for novels like The Sun Also RisesA Farewell to ArmsFor Whom the Bell Tolls, and The Old Man and the Sea, which won the 1953 Pulitzer. In 1954, Hemingway won the Nobel Prize. He committed suicide on July 2, 1961, in Ketchum, Idaho.

Hemingway left behind an impressive body of work and an iconic style that still influences writers today. His personality and constant pursuit of adventure loomed almost as large as his creative talent.

When…

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NaNoWriMo Survival Guide- How To Write a Novel in a Month

Gary D. Holdaway from the Facebook group Fiction Writers Group has graciously shared this great article on how to survive NaNoWriMo! Read now for how to be successful as you write a novel in a month!

Also, check out Gary’s FB site: https://www.facebook.com/groups/490323944710900/

Good luck with NaNo!!!

GD Holdaway

It’s November! And for us writers that means it’s time to draft an entire novel at breakneck speed. Is the end result always great? Hell nah, it’s about as draft as a draft can be. But is it fun, productive, and an epic way to tell yourself the story that’s brewing in your mind? You can bet your arse it is! If you have any doubts about signing up for NaNoWriMo, let’s squash them today, with my NaNoWriMo survival guide. Here a few tips and tricks for how to write a novel in a month.

Just Tell The Story

Encouraging NaNoWriMo survival guide badge, to help readers learn how to write a novel in a monthNaNoWriMo is all about challenging yourself to get your story down on paper (or screen) as fast as possible. Unburden those epic characters from your mind, and bring them to life through words. It’s about breaking the barrier of the dreaded novel, getting the hardest part (finishing) out of the way…

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Grandfather’s Chess Set

 

 

Grandfather’s Chess Set

A Sunday afternoon had not passed in many years that grandfather and grandson had not played chess.

From the time Grayson was six, his grandfather had arrived for Sunday dinner bringing his prized chess set. At first, Grayson was restless, but his grandfather’s calming presence kept him at the table, learning the intense and intellectual game.

As the years passed, Grayson struggled to defeat his grandfather. He would get close, but his grandfather always managed to surprise him week after week with a clever move.

It was when Grayson was seventeen that he won his first game. His grandfather smiled.

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Such a lovely photo, so full of wonder and curiosity.  We lost a few grandfathers this past week, one in Louisville, KY while shopping with his grandson and a few in Pittsburg.  All senseless killings and the world weeps.  I wrote this for all the wonderful grandfathers who love and nourish the souls of their grandchildren.

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Written for a delightful weekly photo prompt challenge called Friday Fictioneers moderated by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields on her very purple blog. Photo prompts are offered on Wednesdays and must be posted by Friday. Each story must be 100-words or less.

If you are a writer, follow the link below to join in the fun or just go on site and read the wonderful stories from some creative minds.

Friday Fictioneers – Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

PHOTO PROMPT © Jeff Arnold

Me? Market My Book? Part Two:  Prepare for Launch

Marketing it both the bain and the lifeblood of an author. Here is Part Two of
Writers Unite!’s series, “Me? Market My Book?” This article is on the basic social media sites an author should join to build a brand prior to publication.

Writers Unite!

twitter-292994_1920Part Two:  Prepare for Launch

 It is never too early to prepare to publish your book. When your muse taps you on the shoulder and suggests that it is time to write, you should begin to create the tools that you need to market yourself and your writing.

Publishers and agents prefer to deal with an author who has a strong presence on the web or other marketing venues. If you are planning on self-publishing, those marketing outlets will be crucial to connecting with buyers for your book.

In this era of social media, there are numerous avenues open to make vital connections to potential readers. Novice writers are often unknown entities within the literary world. Unless you have acquired a public persona in a career field or some other endeavor, your social media reach may only be your family and immediate friends. You need more.

In this article…

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The Guides

rogers-skylight

The Guides

Wandering through the Native American exhibits, serenity consumed me. Quiet voices echoed in my head as I viewed the tribal artifacts. An almost palpable presence hovered over my shoulder as though I was being guided through the museum.

A vivid image from early childhood of my full-blooded Cherokee great-grandmother, then in her nineties, filled my thoughts. She had pulled me close and whispered into my ear, “My child as you live your life, a sense of peace will fill your soul when you see the world through the eyes of your ancestors.”

I knew they were here with me.

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I chose not to focus on the beautiful skylight but on the fact that I believe this image, taken by Roger Bulot, is of the National American Indian Museum at the Smithsonian.  My maternal great-grandmother was full-blood Cherokee as I state in the story. However, the quote came from a Native American I met on the Seminole Reservation in South Florida. I mentioned to him that I felt a contentment sweep over me when I was in the Everglades as if I belonged there.  He smiled and told me that I was looking at the land through the eyes of my ancestors and was at peace.

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Written for a delightful weekly photo prompt challenge called Friday Fictioneers moderated by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields on her very purple blog. Photo prompts are offered on Wednesdays and must be posted by Friday. Each story must be 100-words or less.

If you are a writer, follow the link below to join in the fun or just go on site and read the wonderful stories from some creative minds.

Friday Fictioneers – Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

PHOTO PROMPT © Roger Bultot

the coastal quill … musings of a southern author

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